Ireland’s Eye

Early Christian Times

Around 700 AD three holy men, who were the sons of Nessan a prince of the Royal House of Leinster, established a church on Ireland's Eye. The church was named "Cill Mac Nessan". There they penned a holy manuscript copy of the four Gospels named the Garland of Howth. This is of similar type to the famous Book of Kells and it too is preserved in Trinity College Dublin.

The Vikings were besieged on the Island late in the 9th century and they returned in the 10th century to pillage and plunder it.

Cill Mac Nessan ceased to function as a church in the 13th century, with all monastic activities transferring to St. Mary's Abbey in Howth.

In More Recent Times

Around 700 AD three holy men, who were the sons of Nessan a prince of the Royal House of Leinster, established a church on Ireland's Eye. The church was named "Cill Mac Nessan". There they penned a holy manuscript copy of the four Gospels named the Garland of Howth. This is of similar type to the famous Book of Kells and it too is preserved in Trinity College Dublin.

The Vikings were besieged on the Island late in the 9th century and they returned in the 10th century to pillage and plunder it.

Cill Mac Nessan ceased to function as a church in the 13th century, with all monastic activities transferring to St. Mary's Abbey in Howth.